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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 04:58 
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An acquaintance of mine posted this on Facebook. Any thoughts?

Nine Things That May Disappear In Our Lifetime:

Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them. But, ready or not, here they come.

1. The Post Office

Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Cheque

Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with cheque by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process cheques. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the cheque. This plays right into the death of the post office. If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.

3. The Newspaper

The younger generation simply doesn't read the newspaper. They certainly don't subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.

4. The Book

You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand and turn the literal pages. I said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. And think of the convenience! Once you start flicking your fingers on the screen instead of the book, you find that you are lost in the story, can't wait to see what happens next, and you forget that you're holding a gadget instead of a book.

5. The Land Line Telephone

Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don't need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they've always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes

6. Music

This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It's the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption is the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates are simply self-destructing. Over 40% of the music purchased today is "catalogue items," meaning traditional music that the public is familiar with. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book, "Appetite for Self-Destruction" by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, "Before the Music Dies."

7. Television

Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they're playing games and doing lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds. I say good riddance to most of it. It's time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and through Netflix.

8. The "Things" That You Own

Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. They may simply reside in "the cloud." Today your computer has a hard drive and you store your pictures, music, movies, and documents. Your software is on a CD or DVD, and you can always re-install it if need be. But all of that is changing. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are all finishing up their latest "cloud services." That means that when you turn on a computer, the Internet will be built into the operating system. So, Windows, Google, and the Mac OS will be tied straight into the Internet. If you click an icon, it will open something in the Internet cloud. If you save something, it will be saved to the cloud. And you may pay a monthly subscription fee to the cloud provider. In this virtual world, you can access your music or your books, or your whatever from any laptop or handheld device. That's the good news. But, will you actually own any of this "stuff" or will it all be able to disappear at any moment in a big "Poof?" Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical? It makes you want to run to the closet and pull out that photo album, grab a book from the shelf, or open up a CD case and pull out the insert.

9. Privacy

If there ever was a concept that we can look back on nostalgically, it would be privacy. That's gone. It's been gone for a long time anyway. There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, and even built into your computer and cell phone. But you can be sure that 24/7, "They" know who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits. "They" will try to get you to buy something else. Again and again.

All we will have left that can't be changed are "Memories"....



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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 06:38 
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I'm not sure about the rest of them but for the Book, I'd honestly disagree ((Though given my interest in becoming a Library Technician, this may very well be like a Bank teller telling people that the ATM won't replace them.))

The Book/CD to Data file comparison isn't quite right. Books are not CDs. Digital books may make them irrelevant in day to day, but to Have a Book is different than to have a CD. It's Closer to a record, though it is still not to the same degree. Remember that CDs had a rough lifetime of about a decade. Records have existed for some fifty years or so. Books outpace them both by a few Centuries. They are comparing a storage format to... Well, Whatever it is books represent. Now, I am aware that Books are being replaced as a storage format by reader machines and such. But I just don't think they'll be replaced completely.

Now, on the other hand, it's true that Books will one day no longer be made, but the price isn't the issue Nor is the convenience. The true reason why Books won't be made any more after a certain point likely because they're made with Paper. And tearing down trees so we can enjoy or collect something is probably a bad thing. ((Of course, you could create fake plant fibers in a Lab, or replace them with a silica or Plastic, but then how would you tell you were in a Library if you didn't have that musty Book smell?))



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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 14:15 
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That got significantly more paranoid as it went on.

I agree with Chaz about the books. The comparison between books and CDs isn't really valid. I don't have a sentimental attachment to my CDs (although I do have one to my MP3 player). CDs mostly exist to get shuttled between their cases and their players, you don't really spend time with the actual physical thing. My favorite books, though, have had a lot of time invested in them. They're worn out and cracked and sometimes stained, and they have a lot of memories invested in them. Silly, maybe, but there it is. Also, a tiny scratch can make a CD useless for anything other than hanging in the garden to try and scare off birds, which is part of the reason why I prefer MP3s in general, whereas books can take a surprising amount of damage and remain readable.

The idea that music is going to disappear is downright absurd. The music industry may go through some serious changes and/or vanish entirely, I don't know, but music itself has been a fundamental part of human culture for, like, ever. It's not going anywhere.

As for privacy-I won't argue that there's been no diminishing of it in modern times, but the idea that there's an all-controlling 'They' out to observe and catalog our every movement is...overreacting a bit, I think. Although I do find it rather ironic that they posted that on Facebook.


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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 14:41 
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1. Yes please. It's a financial liability in a time when governments need to cut said liabilities even more desperately than they need to normally. And frankly, the generation that actually CARES about getting personal, physical letters are...kind of on the way out. Basically I expect the baby boomers to take this with them.

2. This one's probably going to be the first one to actually die out of this list, I think. Not because it'll be abolished, but because it'll simply stop being used. A de facto thing. 10 years from now the people at registers will have to call a manager to deal with them because they've never seen one before and the manager'll get all fussy about people not paying attention to training.

3. How is this not ALREADY gone?

4. These will never go away. I don't think anybody here really NEEDS me to go into reasons why.

5. Yep. It'll die a very long, slow, painful death, supported by megacorporations until it's a zombie, though.

6. I read this and literally laughed out loud. Mage pretty much said the fundamental truth of it, but expounding on that: yeah the music industry may be something like the metaphorical headless chicken at the moment, but the idea that innovation is dying out is the downright dumbest thing I have ever heard. People just get that impression because the currently accepted "mainstream" music varieties are outlasting the expected expiration date set by their predecessors by...a lot. It was like people saying that Microsoft had breathed its last because people rejected Vista in favour of sticking with XP even after XP had been abused well after its expiration date set by its own creators. Now everybody's using W7. That having been said, that example really only works in isolation cause Microsoft is an entirely other story on its own. This all having been said, in turn, a large part of the current musical mainstream being superannuated as it is is because of the music industry's current paradigm being mindlessly greedy and, in my own humble opinion, mostly though not entirely evil. Not the cool kind of evil either.

7. While I am super pro-subscription internet television, I don't really think that the television as we currently know it will actually disappear entirely in our lifetime. There are still lots of people who get up in the morning and watch the weather forecast for the day or watch the evening news for school closings the next day and so forth. And while I can see things such as that being finally acceptably replaced in our lifetime, I think it's fair to say that a high number of young people are still forming that habit, or ones like it. I mean what average person doesn't enjoy just plopping before the tube and vegetating after a crappy day? Or having a movie marathon on their or a friend's big screen? Or little screen even? Sure those aren't from a network, movie marathons, but sometimes they are. I know a lot of people who turn on their TV for background noise while ironing or cooking or something, too. I think we also have to take into account places that, you know, aren't first world areas, and don't look like they'll be catching up with the cloud bandwagon any time soon.

8. This is a joke, right?

9. Eh...I don't really know how to handle this one. I've always been of the opinion that civilisation as a whole kinda swings back and forth between physical and virtual frontiers, and as one becomes increasingly regulated, controlled, censored, monitored, what have you, the other is the current "lawless frontier". At the moment, it's true that the virtual realm is indeed starting to have a lasso tightened around it, all things considered, but given we've sorta run out of physical frontiers on planet Earth and the space race is still attempting to be pulled out of its flatlining after the US gave NASA the shaft all while quantum computing and true cloud computing are both erupting into the mainstream (the latter a little ahead of the former, which should be making its big successful début very soon) and all the front-running megacorps that have dominated the computing industry till now are in massive states of flux and weirdness...we'll probably break the perceived cycle and have a renewed digital frontier soon.

-=-=-=-=-

What the hell, we have an active Symposium topic?



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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 15:13 
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I do hope they make some improvements on cell phone technology before landlines go out completely, because we still don't have service out here.

To expound on my previous point about 9.) after mulling it over a bit: I think that this demonstrates a tendency people have to anthropomorphize these things too much. A lot of people-such as this one, apparently- seem to look at the (real or perceived) loss of privacy in modern society and assume that there's a solid intent behind it, that a single force is deliberately stripping away our freedoms for, I dunno, its own amusement or whatever. (Although granted, most people are not quite as explicit in that belief as this example is.) I think the reality is closer to it just being a lot of things that came about independently for various reasons.

Like the shopping thing. Sure, corporations keep track of what you buy, but they're not doing it out of an evil plot to Orwell-ize everything; they're doing it so they can sell you more stuff. That's it. And people seem to think that what this means is that there's some guy holed up in a Wal-Mart complex somewhere poring over your files going, "Hmmmm, yes, I see Jenny Jones bought lots of chocolate ice cream and vodka this week, guess that relationship with Bob Smith didn't work out!" It's just an algorithm stored on a computer somewhere: x bought y, so sell them z. I doubt anyone ever actually looks at that data. And if our lives are so watched over by cameras and Google or whatever that 'they' can find us any time they wish, one would think that our unsolved crime rate would be a hell of a lot lower.

All in all the whole thing sounds like yet another scary internet chain-mail thing about how life is just so terrible these days compared to how it used to be when we all loved each other and ran freely through the fields making daisy-chains without a care in the world.

I might also point out that memories do change over time, so not even the last line is correct.


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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 17:04 
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I don't know about you, but I still pay my rent with cheques. Until my landlord is capable of processing debit or people feel no that there's no problem with carrying hundreds of dollars on their person to pay rent, I'm pretty sure they'll still be around for a while yet.



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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 18:28 
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The Time Being wrote:
That got significantly more paranoid as it went on.
Yes it did. XD (Though I doubt if it was my acquaintance's personal assessment; the style doesn't look like hers. I'd imagine she found it somewhere.) As for my thoughts on the matter...

1. The Post Office
I can't speak for the US, but I would be rather concerned if the Post Office ceased to exist over here. I make a lot of use of it. I can't deny that it's been struggling financially for a considerable time with the big reduction in letters being sent now that everyone has email, and many small branches have been closed. Nevertheless, post offices are still very heavily used - I nearly always have to queue if I go in, and for sending packages there's really no alternative - courier companies like UPS are prohibitively expensive for individuals wanting to send a single item (it's a different matter for businesses wanting send things in bulk, or for whom guaranteed next day delivery is essential). The Post Office also deals with all sorts of other things, like passport applications, driving licence applications, and a host of other things, many of which can be done online (though not passports, since you need to send originals of documents) but which people often have queries about and want to have a real person to discuss them with. My guess is that small village post offices will continue to close and people will have to travel into their nearest town, but that, unless there's some major reconstruction of the way mail and other services are handled, the Post Office as an entity (or an equivalent service) will continue to exist for the foreseeable future.

2. The Cheque
This is already well on its way out here. Many large retailers will no longer accept them. They tend to be used largely for transactions between private individuals and small businesses, where the recipient doesn't have card processing facilities (like Paul's landlord, probably). As electronic means of payment become more sophisticated, I can well imagine there no longer being a need for them eventually (though 2018 seems a bit soon for private individuals to find other means of conveniently passing money around, other than carrying wadges of cash).

3. The Newspaper
Zeth wrote:
How is this not ALREADY gone?
Because the generation that does still read newspapers hasn't died out yet. ;D But yeah, less and less people do read them regularly, and all the major ones have online equivalents. I'm pretty sure it's only a matter of time before they're a thing of the past.

4. The Book
As more and more people start reading ebooks, then the volume of books sold will probably drop, which may result in higher prices due to publishers not having the same economies of scale, but I can't see books ever becoming a thing of the past. Not only are there far too many people who love books (and love to be surrounded by them - you can't exactly fill your house with bookcases full of Kindles :P), but, as Rachel said, digital media aren't permanent. (I found it interesting when I heard recently that apparently the majority of people who buy Kindles and their ilk are older people. It seems the younger generation, who in other respects are the ones who most enthusiastically adopt new technology, are keen to stick with paper books.)

5. The Land Line Telephone
Once mobile phones are sufficiently reliable and there is full coverage, then yes, I don't suppose there will be much need left for landline phones (though in the UK, since most people's broadband is currently carried by phone lines, if you're paying for the line you may as well have a phone attached to it).

6. Music
I found it hard to believe what I was reading when I read " It's the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it." I'd say the internet has provided far more opportunities for innovative new music to reach appreciative audiences than ever before. The record companies may be unwilling to support anything new that they can't be sure will bring in megabucks, but there is loads of musical talent in the world, constantly producing wonderful music and making it available by other means.

7. Television
I'd be surprised if this died out any time soon. I personally watch very little TV, but most people I know watch far more than I do. Yes, much of what's on TV is available online but if I do want to watch a programme I'd far rather be sitting on a comfortable sofa in front of a decent sized screen than sitting up at a desk or table, watching it on a computer. Maybe the way that TV provides its content may change, but I can't see it disappearing just yet.

8. The "Things" That You Own
Rubbish. Even if much of your content is stored on the Cloud, there's nothing stopping you from downloading stuff on to a hard drive. And anyway, these '"things" that you own' are only computer data. We all own far more than what's on our computers.

9. Privacy
I agree with Rachel here. Yes, there are all sorts of ways that the powers that be could find out things about us, but unless we commit some major crime and get investigated, who's going to bother? Most of the stuff that gets recorded is too mundane to be of any interest to actual people, and is used largely as data for automatic systems, if it's even used at all.



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PostPosted: 14 Mar 2013, 23:29 
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This list is clearly made from a middle-to-upper-class first-world perspective. There are still billions of people who have never seen a computer, let alone own one, and as such are very unlikely to be using them for any of these services. Even in developed nations, there are large sections of the population who this stuff doesn't apply to - personally, I can't afford a tablet or e-reader or any kind of handheld device, so I will be buying books for a long time to come.

Regarding the demise of television, though: do some reading on the great data crunch. We're running out of room in the airwaves for all our wireless data, and a large part of that is because television corporations still own a significant portion of the spectrum, and are only using a small part of that. If TV dies, they'll be forced to sell it, and we'll all be better off for it.

Regarding music, I wanted to say pretty much exactly what Dino said. The traditional publishing model isn't working any more, but artists are using platforms like Youtube, Bandcamp, Soundcloud and so on to share their music now, and they are doing quite well for themselves.

Lastly, regarding privacy. This is an actual, legitimate war being fought right this very second, with recruitment and propaganda and espionage and all of that. Even if CISPA and all its other siblings manage to pass, there is still going to be resistance, and this counter-movement will be trying to overturn these changes for generations to come. Until then, there's always the deepweb :T



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PostPosted: 18 Mar 2013, 13:15 
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dinowoman wrote:
you can't exactly fill your house with bookcases full of Kindles :P
Going to breach Symposium protocol here, but frankly everybody who frequents Mercury is mature enough to know when flexibility with the rules is okay:

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PostPosted: 18 Mar 2013, 17:31 
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You could fill your bookcases with Kindles...it would just cost a hell of a lot and be spectacularly pointless.

I think the thing about Kindles is...undoubtedly they have many uses and can be spectacularly convenient, but: what happens if I lose it? Or it gets stolen? Or it gets wet? Or I drop it in a bad way? If I lose one book out of my collection, I can replace it and I still have all the others. If all my books are on the Kindle and something happens to the Kindle, that's all my books gone at once.

Oddly enough I don't have this attitude about my Steam library.


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PostPosted: 18 Mar 2013, 17:40 
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That's because Steam can indefinitely respawn.
Something happens to your computer, you can just get your hands on another, install Steam if it isn't there already, and login. Sure you'll prolly have to wait for the games to install and/or update again, but still, you lose basically nothing.



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PostPosted: 18 Mar 2013, 18:20 
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The Time Being wrote:
You could fill your bookcases with Kindles...it would just cost a hell of a lot and be spectacularly pointless.
Exactly.

Mac tells me you can re-download books you've bought for a Kindle, just like you can with games on Steam but yes, if something happens to it, not only do you have the hassle of re-acquiring all your books, but you have the expense of replacing the Kindle too. But even ignoring the fact that I love being surrounded by physical books, with paper books, unless there was some major catastrophe like the house catching fire or something, I wouldn't expect ever to have to replace more than a few of them (and we have a couple of thousand of them in our house). Kindles are fine for occasional use, I suppose, like maybe going on holiday and not wanting to weigh your luggage down with half a dozen books, but I think I'd opt to have those digital versions in addition to proper, paper books, rather than instead of them.



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PostPosted: 18 Mar 2013, 19:39 
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Well, actually what I was referring to was the possibility of something happening on Valve's end, but I'm not real worried about that because a.) it's rather unlikely, b.) they'd have a lot more people to answer to than me if it did happen and c.) it's not under my control (I don't really trust myself to look after possessions properly).


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PostPosted: 18 Mar 2013, 21:30 
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I'm not sure if it's a good or bad thing, but I think it's probably important that in a lot of cases, a physical copy of a book is significantly cheaper. Either because you can buy a used copy or because publishers have gotten greedy and don't really lower prices on the e-books compared to regular books, which when you then consider that e-books are far more standardized in price means you can often find a physical book on sale for less than the e-book.


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PostPosted: 18 Apr 2013, 12:29 
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This looks like quite an intrinsic topic here, discussing the concepts of fading technologies. But are there other things that may fade out from existance in our lifetime? What about video games and certain technologies used in our vehicles?


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PostPosted: 18 Apr 2013, 18:57 
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Some things have already faded from existence during my lifetime. VHS video recorders and tapes are pretty much obsolete now, but the other two formats that were popular in the early days of VCRs (I was around for the start of the technology as well as the end), Betamax and Video2000 (which I still reckon was better than VHS - our first VCR was a Video2000 one), disappeared long ago.

I'd be surprised if videogames in total disappeared, but it's not unlikely that they could change in format so much as to bear little relationship to the kinds of things we have now.



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PostPosted: 18 Apr 2013, 19:30 
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Videogames change at an incredibly rapid rate, but I see no reason why they would be disappearing any time soon. And however quickly they change, they're still not changing fast enough that I would think we'd stop thinking of them as videogames. I mean, compare Pong to Skryim. The two things have so little in common that an outside observer might not ever think of them as the same thing, but to us, they're both still videogames.

I mean, yeah, some things are going to disappear in our lifetimes. Or at least, things are going to evolve, and if you consider that to mean that the original thing has disappeared, then sure, it's disappeared. An iPhone has almost no resemblance to a rotary telephone, but we still call an iPhone a phone. Have phones disappeared? Depends on your definition, I guess. But that sort of thing has been going on for as long as humankind has been inventing things and then improving them.

It's fun to speculate on what the future's going to be like, especially if you like sci-fi, but as far as I can tell, it generally only leads to people laughing their heads off at us ten-twenty-fifty years down the line. We're not all that good at predicting what things are actually going to be like, mainly because the world is incredibly complicated and bizarre and people think in weird ways and there really is no way to predict what someone's going to invent in their shed tomorrow that will change everything.


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PostPosted: 19 May 2013, 19:30 
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I like to think that maybe, just maybe, the post office will one day decide to update to cover delivery of emails themselves. Something interesting to think about :D


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PostPosted: 20 May 2013, 02:17 
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The only thing that bothers me about that is that the post office survives by charging for its services. I'd hate to have to start paying for emails.



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PostPosted: 20 May 2013, 10:22 
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It would be quite clever of them, though, you have to admit. They'd be swimming in money after a couple of hours.


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PostPosted: 20 May 2013, 11:03 
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Or they would sink deeper into 'the red', since People would continue using the free Services of Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, and some Universities.



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PostPosted: 20 May 2013, 15:50 
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I'm hardly the most tech-savvy person so this may be a stupid thing to say, but I'm confused by what you mean by using "Google" or "Microsoft" to email someone. You mean like over Google+ or WLM? Because that's not very professional. Then there's Gmail, but that's an email service, obviously, so if the post office were charging for emails that would fall under their jurisdiction. Same with Yahoo; I guess we could conduct some kind of message sending system over Yahoo Answers, but I don't see that working out very well. And I don't know about your university but both the college I just got done with and the one I'm transferring to use Outlook. And Microsoft is a company, so...? We route mail through their offices? Hide mail messages in new builds of Windows? Or is there some technically non-email but otherwise extremely email-like service provided by all these groups that I'm blatantly overlooking?


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PostPosted: 20 May 2013, 21:24 
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As far as I'm aware, the majority of people (businesses and organisations included) use a service like hotmail or gmail. You can do...something to do with domains that makes it more professional-ish, so abcd@hotmail.com becomes abcd@profesionalbusiness.com, but even then your business is probably not running the service themselves. My university makes use of microsoft's hotmail service for pretty much everything.

If the post office were to update, I'd say that they could do pretty well to charge something of a small subscription for making an account, then hosting the entire email service themselves, perhaps host business's domains and such. Would keep money coming in for something that requires very little maintenance in comparison to other things they could do, and being such a well-known thing already they'd find it relatively easy to find a trusting base of users..

Then again, I'm probably wrong about what I think I kinda know about this xD I had severe trouble setting up the inbox on my phone (yay for pushy friends who work at phone stores). It's weird to think just how many different, distinctive, methods of communication have sprung up over the last four-five years or so, thinking on it.


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PostPosted: 19 Jun 2013, 22:51 
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I kind of disagree about the land line telephone. I mean, as far as personal use and at home I agree entirely but what about with businesses?


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PostPosted: 19 Jun 2013, 23:37 
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I'm with Brooke there. Landline telephones are probably not going away as quickly as we think. After all, cell phone technology is not at the level where it's more reliable than a landline, and service companies still include landline service with internet and television, for instance.

Let me hit the rest of them.

1. This would be about as good an idea in the U.S. as always-online connectivity. Fed-Ex and UPS reserve the right, as I'm aware, to not service certain areas, so if the USPS went down, several places wouldn't be able to get ANY mail, let alone junk mail. And considering that more people order their stuff from online (I know people who get certain groceries, online, for instance, and I know others who get medication mailed to them monthly) I don't see it dying completely.

2. I'm fine with checks going away. I hate carrying them around, and debit cards do exactly the same thing AND fit into my wallet.

3. Possibly. I don't know that everyone will be forced to subscribe to get their news though. There are still plenty of independent news sites out there that I doubt it.

4. The book isn't going away for a long time, partially because people are falling in love with used books and partially because publishers still want money from things like college textbooks. What you will see an increase of is likely licenses to use certain software with books, like some college textbooks are like.

5. Addressed above.

6. This is the dumbest thing on this list. Next.

7. They mean THE television, right? Not television overall? Because the former, I can KIND of see? The latter, not so much, especially since video game consoles, DVD players, etc. still exist.

8. Sort of. Some things you're just never going to be able to make digital copies of, unless we somehow find a way to make holographic clothing and furniture, for instance, which I imagine would come with its own issues.

9. This was gone a long, long time ago.

Also, I have to say here: psychologists found out ways to change your memories a long time ago... =)



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